François Clerc for Made In Design: Milord

François Clerc: Milord

François Clerc for Made In Design: Milord

François Clerc: Milord

François Clerc for Made In Design: Milord

François Clerc’s Milord functions as a mirror and comments on the face we show to the world. Is the reflection others see the true reflection of ourselves and how much knowledge of a person do we truly gain from outer appearances? By exposing the mirror’s empty inner form, Milord suggests that our outer images are only a thin layer of what truly lies within.

From François Clerc: Here is Milord, a freestanding mirror with a multifaceted form. Milord is a real dandy reflecting all around but for once we can see what lies behind the mirror, the empty shell. With this project I wanted to underline the fragility of our reflected image, the frailty of our appearance. I wanted to show what’s behind the mirror, the empty shell.

Made of stainless steel.
W 24 cm x D 25 cm x H 46 cm

Thanks to François for his submission to designgush.

François Clerc: website  Made in Design: website

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Studio Daniel: Vederlicht (Featherlight)

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

The dictionary defines “light” in the physical sense as a noun: the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible, a verb: to provide with light or lighting; illuminate and finally as an adjective: of little weight; easy to lift. Studio Daniel’s Vederlicht achieves all three of these definitions using lightweight materials to provide a structure for illumination. Vederlicht houses that which has no borders and gives form to the intangible.

From Studio Daniel: Vederlicht is a fascination that I had when I was a small child, the fascination of model glider plane. Back then these planes cost too much for me to buy and I only could look at them in the shop. The small kid in me is still there so i took the technique and material for making a glider and used it to design a lighting. The material used in this design is Balsa wood and Oracover which is used to cover the wings of a glider and gives the lamp altogether it’s ultra lightweight.

Thanks to Daniel Hulsbergen of Studio Daniel for his submission to designgush.

Studio Daniel: website


Alekzandr Leidenfrost for Goebel & Co: Alek Table

Alekzandr Leidenfrost for Goebel & Co: Alek Table

Alekzandr Leidenfrost for Goebel & Co: Alek Table

Alekzandr Leidenfrost for Goebel & Co: Alek Table

Alekzandr Leidenfrost for Goebel & Co: Alek Table

Goebel & Co’s reduced width dining table seeks to free-up interior space and consequently brings diners within closer proximity, forcing a more intimate dining experience. A good lesson in what city dwellers (and those who live in small spaces) already know: space is a luxury but not a necessity, social benefits can arise from that which we lack,  and people are adaptable to the space in which they live. Details from the design team below.

From Goebel & Co: Many of our clients live in small square footage homes and apartments. This leaves many of them eating dinner at coffee tables and not at home. We engaged designer, Alekzandr Leidenfrost of Hamburg to study the primal need for personal space while eating and drinking in order to create a dining table concept which would achieve personal space needs while eliminating unused square footage. Our original concept prototype toys with this yet is quite long. Obviously this is in contradiction of reducing spacial needs but with our Alek Table prototype we are able to achieve our reduction of square footage while seating 8. Many European public areas such as beer gardens and festival tables examine this concept but we were not able to come across any for residential use. By reducing the distance from fellow diners, dining experience is dramatically changed and we believe enhanced. The Alek table comes in 7.5 foot and 5 foot lengths. It is also available in a 34″ width.

Thanks to Goelbel & Co for their submission to designgush.

Goebel & Co: website


Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sladle & Stabber from Sharon Myoung and Tony Kim mix form and function creating a unique set of utensil shapes designed with on-the-go camping in mind. The tools necessitate hunting down the desired handle, maximizing the adventure for which a camping trip begs.

From Sharon MYoung & Tony Kim: Part of the series “Urban Camping”, these camping utensils bring modern aesthetic to camping lifestyle. By attaching twigs onto our multi-purpose utensil heads, backpackers and campers can travel light and scavenge for their handles. With aims to hybridize indoor comfort with outdoor objects, these utensils will enhance the outdoor experience.

1. Scavenge for a stick. Fight off a bear while doing so.
2. Shave/trim off edges(if need be) to fit snug into the diameter of Hexagon Nut
3. Rotate & Screw to the neck of either utensils!

Sharon MYoung: website  Tony Kim: website


Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke’s Woven desk design takes a new angle on the style and intimacy a worker has with his or her privacy in the workplace. His visually enticing design creates a personal space that still allows for collaborative working and communication, a theme tackled today by many designers as people continue to spend increasing amounts of time in their working environments. Modern corporate design moves away from cubicle-style layouts creating low level walls with open air space, encouraging dynamic involvement; Vanderbeke’s design adds an aesthetic twist as well.

From Bram Vanderbeke: A desk where it is possible to work very personally/privately, but without losing contact with everything around the working space.

Bram Vanderbeke: website


Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair (before transformation)

Adrien Rovero’s Rock Garden Chair is one interpretation of 40 that the Mountain Climbers project has commissioned for a charity project to benefit Switzerland’s Make-A-Wish foundation, as described by Mountain Climbers below. Rovero’s design turns a re-purposed cable car into a rocking chair of sorts as a way of simulating the natural rocking sensation that ski gondolas produce.

From Mountain Climbers: Mountain Climbers: Revisiting a Swiss Icon is an entrepreneurial project that is 100% Swiss, cultural, and ambitious, and which follows a logic of sustainable development and recycling for a charitable outcome. It consists of re-purposing 40 ski cable cars which will be dismantled and then given to 40 Swiss artists, architects and designers, ones that are considered to be rising stars in their fields. These participants will work for free; they will receive a budget in order to cover the cost of materials necessary to create their projects. The cars, once transformed, will go on exposition around Switzerland, then will be sold through auction by Christie’s to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Switzerland, which makes dreams come true for sick Swiss children. (Translated by dg)

Adrien Rovero: website Mountain Climbers: website via: MoCo Loco


RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

Manhattan-based studio RUX Design, founded by Russell Greenberg, adds a layer of subtle symbolism to the classic wedding band with their Cameo by Rux rings. Birthed while shopping for his own nuptials, Greenberg strives to create heirloom objects as a close-up look reveals the facial silhouette of a chosen subject. Through this unique customization, the objects discreetly combine the symbolism of traditional wedding bands with personalized visual representations.

From RUX Design: At first glance, Cameo by RUX rings look like ordinary ridged bands. But focus your eye on their far edge and tiny silhouettes begin to emerge: the slope of a forehead, the curve of a nose, the outline of lips and a chin. They are discreet, intimate, and completely individual, made to order from a photograph of yourself or the person or people you love most. Wear one classic band, or a row of several stacking rings at a time. The Classic Cameo is just over 1/4″ thick and the Stacking Cameo is 1/8″ thick. Custom widths are available upon request.

Cameo by Rux: website


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