Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sharon Myoung & Tony Kim: Sladle & Stabber

Sladle & Stabber from Sharon Myoung and Tony Kim mix form and function creating a unique set of utensil shapes designed with on-the-go camping in mind. The tools necessitate hunting down the desired handle, maximizing the adventure for which a camping trip begs.

From Sharon MYoung & Tony Kim: Part of the series “Urban Camping”, these camping utensils bring modern aesthetic to camping lifestyle. By attaching twigs onto our multi-purpose utensil heads, backpackers and campers can travel light and scavenge for their handles. With aims to hybridize indoor comfort with outdoor objects, these utensils will enhance the outdoor experience.

1. Scavenge for a stick. Fight off a bear while doing so.
2. Shave/trim off edges(if need be) to fit snug into the diameter of Hexagon Nut
3. Rotate & Screw to the neck of either utensils!

Sharon MYoung: website  Tony Kim: website

About these ads

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke: Woven

Bram Vanderbeke’s Woven desk design takes a new angle on the style and intimacy a worker has with his or her privacy in the workplace. His visually enticing design creates a personal space that still allows for collaborative working and communication, a theme tackled today by many designers as people continue to spend increasing amounts of time in their working environments. Modern corporate design moves away from cubicle-style layouts creating low level walls with open air space, encouraging dynamic involvement; Vanderbeke’s design adds an aesthetic twist as well.

From Bram Vanderbeke: A desk where it is possible to work very personally/privately, but without losing contact with everything around the working space.

Bram Vanderbeke: website


Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair (before transformation)

Adrien Rovero’s Rock Garden Chair is one interpretation of 40 that the Mountain Climbers project has commissioned for a charity project to benefit Switzerland’s Make-A-Wish foundation, as described by Mountain Climbers below. Rovero’s design turns a re-purposed cable car into a rocking chair of sorts as a way of simulating the natural rocking sensation that ski gondolas produce.

From Mountain Climbers: Mountain Climbers: Revisiting a Swiss Icon is an entrepreneurial project that is 100% Swiss, cultural, and ambitious, and which follows a logic of sustainable development and recycling for a charitable outcome. It consists of re-purposing 40 ski cable cars which will be dismantled and then given to 40 Swiss artists, architects and designers, ones that are considered to be rising stars in their fields. These participants will work for free; they will receive a budget in order to cover the cost of materials necessary to create their projects. The cars, once transformed, will go on exposition around Switzerland, then will be sold through auction by Christie’s to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Switzerland, which makes dreams come true for sick Swiss children. (Translated by dg)

Adrien Rovero: website Mountain Climbers: website via: MoCo Loco


RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

RUX Design: Cameo by Rux Rings

Manhattan-based studio RUX Design, founded by Russell Greenberg, adds a layer of subtle symbolism to the classic wedding band with their Cameo by Rux rings. Birthed while shopping for his own nuptials, Greenberg strives to create heirloom objects as a close-up look reveals the facial silhouette of a chosen subject. Through this unique customization, the objects discreetly combine the symbolism of traditional wedding bands with personalized visual representations.

From RUX Design: At first glance, Cameo by RUX rings look like ordinary ridged bands. But focus your eye on their far edge and tiny silhouettes begin to emerge: the slope of a forehead, the curve of a nose, the outline of lips and a chin. They are discreet, intimate, and completely individual, made to order from a photograph of yourself or the person or people you love most. Wear one classic band, or a row of several stacking rings at a time. The Classic Cameo is just over 1/4″ thick and the Stacking Cameo is 1/8″ thick. Custom widths are available upon request.

Cameo by Rux: website


Mikko Paakkanen for Nikari: June

Mikko Paakkanen for Nikari: June

Mikko Paakkanen for Nikari: June

Mikko Paakkanen for Nikari: June

Mikko Paakkanen’s June chandelier mimics traditional chandelier forms while deleting unnecessary ornament and frills. The glowing tips take the place of what would traditionally have been candles or, in more modern times, electric representations thereof. While the lack of supported, lit candles make this specific form unnecessary, Paakkanen references the shape and structure with a nostalgic nod to a recognizable form.

From Nikari: We delicately manufacture exquisite quality furniture and products of the local forests’ wood in Fiskars Village. Because number 12 is the number of the year and there are 12 months in a year, we asked twelve designers or design studios to study our philosophy and give their comments to it in a form of a wooden product. We co-operate with the Finnish WWF and part of the sales price is donated to protecting rainforests and forests globally. During 2012 we will manufacture 12 pieces’ numbered series of each product.

Mikko Paakkanen: website Nikari: website via Deco-Design


Haworth: Shetland Rocking Stool

Haworth: Shetland Rocking Stool

Haworth: Shetland Rocking Stool

Haworth: Shetland Rocking Stool

Showing off at Neocon 2012 last week in Chicago, Haworth’s Shetland Rocking Stool clearly communicates “Rocking Horse” even though its form exhibits almost none of the identifying parts. With a curved bottom and saddled top, the correlation is clear and made appropriate for adults. Designed as a means for quick meeting spots, the Shetland Rocking Stool combines streamlined modern lines with a slightly wild textile accents and provides a lighthearted moment for any environment.

Haworth: website


Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Seen at NeoCon 2012 in Chicago this past week, Patricia Urquiola debuts her new Hosu design for Coalesse, which promotes the growing office trend of relaxation in the workplace as a means to improve employee performance. The seating features Urquiola’s original textile, Hexa, a matelassé honeycomb design with a soft and textural touch. With options for upright or feet-up positions, the relaxed style offers a welcoming element to the overall design making the seating a great option for office and home alike.

From Coalesse: As mobile work moves around, it often needs to spread out — at home, at universities, in hotel rooms, even in creative business environments. Hosu encourages spreading out. Designed by Patricia Urquiola, this unique work lounge creates a comforting personal space to relax and get things done. The single seat lounge can be ordered with convertible chaise foldout. The two-seat sofa brings two people together even if they are focused on different tasks. Hosu features convenient rear and side storage pockets and cord pass-through. Its unique textured fabric, also designed by Urquiola, is offered in five exclusive colors.

Patricia Urquiola: website  Coalesse: website


Tanya Aguiñiga: Rope Lights

Tanya Aguinñiga: Rope Lights

Tanya Aguiñiga: Rope Lights

Tanya Aguiñiga: Rope Lights

Tanya Aguiñiga: Rope Lights

Lighting, textiles and sculpture come together in Tanya Aguiñiga’s organically composed wall installations. Adaptable to endless configurations on or off the wall, the pieces integrate traditional crochet craft technique with an artist’s approach to design. The drama of Aguiñiga’s Rope Lights increases with number as they come alive in choreographed compositions.

From Tanya Aguiñiga: These compact fluorescent lights are covered in hand-knitted 100% cotton rope that is custom made in Los Angeles. They are made to order by the foot and are modular. They live in a space between minimalist light art and 1970′s crochet while paying homage to the ubiquitous office space lighting.

Tanya Aguiñiga: website


Lukas Peet for Roll & Hill: Rudi

Lukas Peet for Roll & Hill: Rudi

Lukas Peet for Roll & Hill: Rudi, Double Loop

Lukas Peet for Roll & Hill: Rudi, Single Loop

Lukas Peet’s Rudi design for Roll & Hill pares down form and material to the most simple elements. With a single or double elongated loop, the pendant elegantly hangs from a knotted cord, which is brilliantly incorporated into the design of the light. The knot itself performs double duty as a functional and decorative element and leaves its construction a bit of mystery to the viewer’s first glance.

From Roll & Hill: Jewelry is the inspiration for Rudi, a series of pendant lamps named after Lukas Peet’s father. Rudi is made from bent brass tubes that hold handmade cold cathode lamps. The fixtures hang from their cords, which are knotted around the metal tubes.

Lukas Peet: website Roll & Hill: website


Matt Gagnon Studio: Knit Fort

Matt Gagnon Studio: Knit Fort – Mark Lantosca Photography

Matt Gagnon Studio: Knit Fort – Mark Lantosca photography

Matt Gagnon Studio: Knit Fort

Matt Gagnon Studio: Knit Fort

Matt Gagnon Studio: Knit Fort

Shown at The  Standard Hotel, East Village in NY as part of Sight Unseen’s “Hotel California” exhibit, Matt Gagnon Studio brings us Knit Fort, based off of the construction technique of his Squeeze Lamp series. By repeating a simple wooden shape in a seemingly-haphazard but most-likely exacting method, Gagnon brings and animated feel to an exterior/interior design that provides both shade and light and a sociable level of privacy.

From Matt Gagnon Studio: The Knit Fort is a flexible hardwood structure that can be made to fit the size and shape of your desires. The repetition of two wooden parts creates a complex textural surface. The assembly technique, similar to knitting, allows the addition or subtraction of columns responding to the site context without altering the design. Depending on the scale, the structure can be a play space, terrace sunshade, conference room dome, outdoor shower or interior/ exterior cabana.

Matt Gagnon Studio: website


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 589 other followers